If you have muscle and joint pain in your hip, here's what you need to know about the make up of your body.

Muscles and Bones: The Make Up of Your Hip Joint Pain

Various muscles, bones, and tendons make up your hip joint. When one or more of these parts is damaged or worn down, muscle and joint pain in your hip can occur.

Pain and stiffness in your hip results from injuries or deterioration of the bones, muscles, and tendons that are part of this joint. By taking a closer look at the different parts of this joint, you can have a better understanding of what might be causing muscle and joint pain and what potential treatment options may help you.

Hip Bones

Your hip joint includes two bones that form a ball-and-socket joint. These bones are your pelvis and femur, or thighbone. The rounded end of your thighbone forms the ball, while the lower part of your pelvis forms the socket. These bones work together to make it possible for you to walk, bend, run, and do a whole range of movements. Cartilage prevents your hip bones from bumping against each other when you move.

These are some of the problems that can lead to hip bone pain:

  • Hip fractures: These occur when part of the thighbone breaks from trauma, or an underlying medical condition that weakens bones, such as osteoporosis. In some cases, the socket of the hip joint also breaks. The type of treatment needed depends on the type and severity of the hip fracture. Surgical methods for repairing hip fractures include placing screws in the joint to stabilize it, replacing the ball of the hip joint, and replacing the ball and socket, which is known as a total hip replacement.
  • Osteoarthritis: This condition occurs when the cartilage that cushions the hip bones wears away, which results in hip bone pain and stiffness as the bones rub together. Osteoarthritis can be treated with lifestyle modifications, such as limiting certain activities and losing weight to ease pressure on the hip joint. It can also be treated with physical therapy, pain medications, the use of assistive devices and surgery. Surgical options for this kind of hip bone pain include an osteotomy to ease stress on the hip joint, a total hip replacement, and hip resurfacing, which involves removing damaged cartilage and bone and putting a metal shell in place.

Hip Muscles and Tendons

Hip muscles and tendons include gluteal muscles, the iliotibial band, adductor muscles, rectus femoris muscle, and iliopsoas muscle. Gluteal muscles help keep your pelvis stable as you move, while the iliotibial band helps support gluteal muscle function and provide stability. Your adductor muscles are found on the inside of your thighs, and your rectus femoris muscles are located on the front of your thighs. Your iliopsoas muscle is found near your upper thighbone.

These muscle and tendon issues can cause pain in your hip:

  • Muscle strain: Your hip muscles can become strained from an acute injury or through overuse, which causes muscles to become weaker. Hip strains range from mild to severe. Nonsurgical hip pain treatment, such as applying heat, exercising, and undergoing physical therapy can typically help mild strains heal, but severe ones might require surgery to repair torn muscles.
  • Tendonitis: Tendonitis can occur when the iliopsoas tendon becomes inflamed due to an injury or overuse, leading to soreness, especially when bending. Hip pain treatment options for tendonitis include anti-inflammatory medications and limited activity for milder cases. Severe cases or tendonitis that does not respond to nonsurgical treatments might require arthroscopy. This method involves placing a small camera and surgical instruments inside the affected area to remove the inflamed tissue and restore normal movement.

If you want to know more about hip pain treatment, contact Arkansas Surgical Hospital at 877-918-7020 for an appointment. Our renowned orthopedic surgeons will evaluate your condition and recommend the most effective treatment.

Need help making an appointment with a surgeon?

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